Bibliography Style Editor For Firefox

This page lists all keyboard shortcuts used by the developer tools built into Firefox.

The first section lists the shortcut for opening each tool and the second section lists shortcuts that are applicable to the Toolbox itself. After that there's one section for each tool, which lists the shortcuts that you can use within that tool.

Because access keys are locale-dependent, they're not documented in this page.

Opening and closing tools

These shortcuts work in the main browser window to open the specified tool. For tools that are hosted in the Toolbox, they work to close the tool if it is active. For tools like the Browser Console that open in a new window, you have to close the window to close the tool.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Open Toolbox (with the most recent tool activated) + + + + + +
Bring Toolbox to foreground (if the Toolbox is in a separate window and not in foreground) + + or + + or + + or
Close Toolbox (if the Toolbox is in a separate window and in foreground) + + or + + or + + or
Open Web Console 1 + + + + + +
Toggle Inspector + + + + + +
Open Debugger + + + + + +
Open Style Editor + + 1 +
Open Profiler + + 1 +
Open Network Monitor 2 + + + + + +
Toggle Developer Toolbar + + 1 +
Toggle Responsive Design Mode + + + + + +
Open Browser Console 3 + + + + + +
Open Browser Toolbox + + + + + + + + +
Open Scratchpad + + +
Open WebIDE + + +
Storage Inspector 4 + + +

1. Unlike the other toolbox-hosted tools, this shortcut does not also close the Web Console. Instead, it focuses on the Web Console's command line. To close the Web Console, use the global toolbox shortcut of + + ( + + on a Mac).

2. Before Firefox 55, the keyboard shortcut was + + ( + + on a Mac).

3. Until Firefox 38, when the Browser Console is hidden by a normal Firefox window, the same key combination closes the Browser Console. From Firefox 38 onwards, if the Browser Console is hidden by a normal Firefox window, this key combination brings the Browser Console back on top and focuses on it.

4. The tool is disabled by default, so the shortcut would not work until it is enabled from the Settings Panel

Toolbox

Source editor

This table lists the default shortcuts for the source editor.

In the Editor Preferences section of the developer tools settings, you can choose to use Vim, Emacs, or Sublime Text key bindings instead.

To select these, visit , select the setting , and assign "vim" or "emacs", or "sublime" to that setting. If you do this, the selected bindings will be used for all the developer tools that use the source editor. You need to reopen the editor for the change to take effect.

From Firefox 33 onwards, the key binding preference is exposed in the Editor Preferences section of the developer tools settings, and you can set it there instead of .

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Go to line + + +
Find in file + + +
Find again + + +
Select all + + +
Cut + + +
Copy + + +
Paste + + +
Undo + + +
Redo + + / + + + / + + + / +
Indent
Unindent + + +
Move line(s) up + + +
Move line(s) down + + +
Comment/uncomment line(s) + + +

Page Inspector

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Inspect Element + + + + + +

Node picker

These shortcuts work while the node picker is active.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Select the element under the mouse and cancel picker mode
Select the element under the mouse and stay in picker mode (new in Firefox 52)+++

HTML pane

These shortcuts work while you're in the Inspector's HTML pane.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Delete the selected node
Undo delete of a node + + +
Redo delete of a node + + / + + + / + + + / +
Move to next node (expanded nodes only)
Move to previous node
Move to first node in the tree.
Move to last node in the tree.
Expand currently selected node
Collapse currently selected node
(When a node is selected) move inside the node so you can start stepping through attributes.
Step forward through the attributes of a node
Step backward through the attributes of a node + + +
(When an attribute is selected) start editing the attribute
Hide/show the selected node
Focus on the search box in the HTML pane + + +
Edit as HTML
Stop editing HTML / + / + / +
Copy the selected node's outer HTML (new in Firefox 42). +  + +
Scroll the selected node into view (new in Firefox 44).
Find the next match in the markup, when searching is active
Find the previous match in the markup, when searching is active (new in Firefox 48). + + +

These shortcuts work when the breadcrumbs bar is focused.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Move to the previous element in the breadcrumbs bar 
Move to the next element in the breadcrumbs bar 
Focus the HTML pane + + +
Focus the CSS pane

CSS pane

These shortcuts work when you're in the Inspector's CSS pane.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Focus on the search box in the CSS pane + + +
Clear search box content (only when the search box is focused, and content has been entered)
Step forward through properties and values
Step backward through properties and values + + +
Start editing property or value (Rules view only, when a property or value is selected, but not already being edited) or or or
Cycle up and down through auto-complete suggestions (Rules view only, when a property or value is being edited) , , ,
Choose current auto-complete suggestion (Rules view only, when a property or value is being edited) or or or
Increment selected value by 1
Decrement selected value by 1
Increment selected value by 100 + + +
Decrement selected value by 100 + + +
Increment selected value by 10 + + +
Decrement selected value by 10 + + +
Increment selected value by 0.1 + ( + from Firefox 60 onwards.) + + ( + from Firefox 60 onwards.)
Decrement selected value by 0.1 + ( + from Firefox 60 onwards). + + ( + from Firefox 60 onwards).
Show/hide more information about current property (Computed view only, when a property is selected, new in Firefox 49). or or or
Open MDN reference page about current property (Computed view only, when a property is selected, new in Firefox 49).
Open current CSS file in Style Editor (Computed view only, when more information is shown for a property and a CSS file reference is focused, new in Firefox 49).

Debugger

Debugger (Before Firefox 52)

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Open the Debugger + + + + + +
Search in the current source using the script filter + + +
Find next in the current source / / /
Find previous in the current source + / + / + /
Search in all sources using the script filter + + + + + +
Search for scripts by name + / + + / + + / +
Search for function definitions + + +
Filter variables when execution is paused + + + + + +
Resume execution when at a breakpoint1
Step over1
Step into1
Step out + + 1 +
Toggle breakpoint on the currently selected line + + +
Toggle conditional breakpoint on the currently selected line + + + + + +
Add selected text to Watch expressions + + + + + +
Go to line using the script filter + + +
Search using the script filter + + +
In the source pane, jump to a function definition (new in Firefox 44) + click + click + click

1. By default, on some Macs, the function key is remapped to use a special feature: for example, to change the screen brightness or the volume. See this guide to using these keys as standard function keys. To use a remapped key as a standard function key, hold the Function key down as well (so to open the Profiler, use + + ).

Web Console

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Open the Web Console + + + + + +
Search in the message display pane + + +
Clear the object inspector pane
Focus on the command line + + + + + +
Clear output

+

From Firefox 44:

+ +

+

+

From Firefox 44:

+ +

Command line interpreter

These shortcuts apply when you're in the command line interpreter.

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Scroll to start of console output (only if the command line is empty)
Scroll to end of console output (only if the command line is empty)
Page up through console output
Page down through console output
Go backward through command history
Go forward through command history
Move to the beginning of the line + +
Move to the end of the line + +
Execute the current expression
Add a new line, for entering multiline expressions + + +

These shortcuts apply while the autocomplete popup is open:

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Choose the current autocomplete suggestion
Cancel the autocomplete popup
Move to the previous autocomplete suggestion
Move to the next autocomplete suggestion
Page up through autocomplete suggestions
Page down through autocomplete suggestions
Scroll to start of autocomplete suggestions
Scroll to end of autocomplete suggestions

Style Editor

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Open the Style Editor + + +
Open autocomplete popup + + +

Scratchpad

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Open the Scratchpad + + +
Run Scratchpad code + + +
Run Scratchpad code, display the result in the object inspector + + +
Run Scratchpad code, insert the result as a comment + + +
Re-evaluate current function + + +
Reload the current page, then run Scratchpad code + + + + + +
Save the pad + + +
Open an existing pad + + +
Create a new pad + + +
Close Scratchpad + + +
Pretty print the code in Scratchpad + + +
Show autocomplete suggestions + + +
Show inline documentation + + + + + +

Eyedropper

CommandWindowsOS XLinux
Select the current color
Dismiss the Eyedropper
Move by 1 pixel
Move by 10 pixels + + +

Document Tags and Contributors

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 Last updated by:chrisdavidmills,

How The Output Style Editor Works

The Output Style Editor allows you to create custom output styles by either creating a completely new style or modifying an existing output style to suit your needs.

You can also take an existing output style and add formatting for specific languages (called Alternate Languages).  This is very useful if you will have a multi-language bibliography (a bibliography with references in more than one language).

An Output Style is any combination of in-text citations, notes (footnote or endnote) and a bibliography.  You have to set up each section that is appropriate for your desired output.  

There are two major components to every output style –

  • The Settings:  There are settings for the Bibliography, the In-Text Citations and the Notes that determine line spacing, headings, sort order, etc.  You determine the settings for each area as necessary.

  • The Reference Type definitions:  Each of the three areas (Bibliography, In-Text Citations and Notes) can have defined reference types where you decide exactly which fields of information are used, the order of the fields, as well as any punctuation, spacing and text attributes for every reference type you need to have for your final output (i.e., a book, a journal, a web page, a dissertation, etc.).

All of these items need to be considered when creating or modifying a style.

Note:  This section of the help will provide you with basic instructions on modifying or creating an output style.  Please click on the blue links for more detailed information needed to complete your output style.

Before you begin to define or modify a style, we suggest locating the Instructions to Authors or Style Guide for the particular journal, publication or style format.  This should provide you with the information you need to create your output style, as well as some sample references. In some cases, you may need to write the publisher of the journal or publication as the instructions will not provide you with enough detailed information to make sure your style is correct.

Here are some tips to help you:

  • Go to the journal or publication’s website and locate the Instructions for Authors (may also be called Author's Guide).  

  • In many situations, a publications output style is based on one of the standard styles (i.e., MLA, Chicago, APA, Uniform Requirements, CBE, etc.).  If your style is based on a style we currently have, then you need only to clone/copy it by saving it with a new name.  Even though some journals will say they are based on another style, they may have made some minor changes which you will need to make in your new style.   

  • Check any examples in the Instructions for Authors.  These reference examples are what you will use to define and check your output against.

  • Modifying a current style is the easiest way to create a custom style.

Modifying an Existing Output Style

The first thing you need to do is locate an existing output style that most closely matches your desired output.

Note:  You cannot make changes to output styles that are site-wide (the name appears in black text).  You can copy these styles by saving them with a unique name (that will appear in red text) and then you can make changes.  These “personal styles” will only appear in your RefWorks account.

Mac users will see the red text if using Safari, Mozilla and Netscape, but not with IE 5.x.

Locating an Existing Output Style

  1. Select Bibliography, Output Style Editor from the menu.

  2. Locate the output style you wish to modify in the Style drop-down at the top of the screen.  Note:  If you are not sure which style you want to modify, you can view any output style's formatting and sample references by clicking on the View button at the bottom of the screen.

  3. Once you have found a style you want to use, you must rename it (the name cannot be the same as the original) in the area that says Name.

  4. You can also include a link to a web page (perhaps to the Instructions to Authors or publication website) in the Link field.  Make sure you include the entire URL including the http://.

  5. You can add overall style comments or notes to yourself in the Comments area.  Do not include carriage returns in your comments.

  6. Make any changes to the Citation Type settings. 

  7. Click the Save As button.

  8. Your new style will now appear in the Style drop-down in red lettering.  Only you will see this style in your personal account.

  9. Click the Edit button.

Now that you have located a style and renamed it, you are ready to modify it to meet your needs.

Style Components

There are two components to each style –- the Settings and the defined Reference Types.  You will need to check all the settings and styles to make sure they are exact or similar to what you need.

To modify a style you will:

  • Check the Citation Type

  • Check the Settings

  • Check the defined Reference Types

Checking the Citation Type

When you first select an output style to modify, there is a Citation Type drop-down.  The default Citation Type is In-Text Citation Only.  You have three options for the Citation Type (You'll want to make sure the citation type is appropriate for your output style):   

  • For In-text citations with a bibliography at the end of the paper, select In-Text Citations Only.  For information on how to define in-text citations click here.

  • For Notes at the bottom of each page or at the end of your document, select Notes Only.  This feature works with your Word Processing software’s footnote/endnote feature.  For information on defining notes click here.

  • For a combination of in-text citations and footnotes, select In-Text Citations and Notes (also includes a bibliography if needed).

Checking the Settings

Each component of the output style has it's own settings.   The settings are options that are applied to the whole output style.  Settings can include line spacing, ending punctuation, indenting, numbering, sort order, etc.  The settings for your bibliography will be different from the settings for your in-text citations and/or footnotes.

To view or modify the settings:

  1. Click on the tabbed area you wish to check (Bibliography opens by default).
  2. Expand the settings area by clicking on the appropriate heading (i.e., Bibliography settings, Citation settings or Notes settings (this is determined by your selection in the Citation Type drop-down).  
  3. Make any changes and click the save button.  

Checking the Defined Reference Types

  1. As you check each of the appropriate settings, you can also check the defined Reference Types for the Bibliography, In-Text Citations and Notes (as applicable to your output style).

  2. Preview each formatted reference type that has been defined by selecting that type from the Reference Type drop-down located above the Fields for this Type and Output Fields Order boxes. Each reference type that has been set up for the output style will say [defined] after it. You can view it in the Preview of Bibliography Output area at the bottom of the screen.  Make sure the defined reference type matches the examples in the Instructions to Authors.  Look for the proper order of the elements, as well as punctuation and text attributes (bold, italics and underline) where appropriate.

  3. Click on the appropriate link for detailed information on how to define a reference type for a Bibliography, In-Text Citation or Notes.  

    Note
    :  In the Bibliography or Notes reference type definitions, every output style MUST have at least a generic reference type defined.  The generic reference type is used as a default and will be used by any reference in your database that does not find its appropriate defined reference type.  You can modify the generic style, but we do not recommend deleting it. We recommend defining each reference type that you store in your database.  This also applies to In-Text Citations when text information is included in the citation style.  

    If the In-Text Citation format requires numeric values only, then there will not be any defined reference types.

  4. Click on each the individual fields in the Output Fields Order box to change any established definition.  You can use the up and down arrow icons to change the order of the fields or the left and right arrow icons to add or remove fields.

  5. Once you have checked and modified your settings and reference type definitions, click the Save button.  We recommend you generate a trial bibliography using your new style in the Bibliography, Create area of RefWorks.

Creating a New Output Style

You have the ability to build an output style in its entirety (i.e., not copying an existing style – click here for information on Modifying an Existing Output Style).  

Tip:  Before starting, make sure to have the Instructions to Authors available.

To create a new output style:

  1. Access the Output Style Editor from the Bibliography menu option.

  2. Click the New button.

  3. In the Name box, type the name of the new style.

  4. You can also include a link to a web page (perhaps to the Instructions to Authors or publication website) in the Link area.  Make sure you include the entire URL including the http://.

  5. You can add comments or notes to yourself in the Comments area located below the name of your style. Do not include carriage returns in your comments.

  6. Choose your Citation Type(In-text citations only, Notes only, In-text citations AND Notes).

    • For In-text citations with a bibliography at the end of the paper, select In-Text Citations only.  For information on how to define in-text citations click here.

    • For Notes at the bottom of each page or at the end of your document, select Notes Only.  This feature works with your Word Processing software’s footnote/endnote feature.  For information on defining notes click here.

    • For a combination of in-text citations and footnotes, select In-Text Citations and Notes (also includes a bibliography if needed).

  1. Click the Save As button.

  2. Click the Edit button to continue creating your output style.

Style Components

There are two components to each style –- the Settings and the defined Reference Types.  You will need to establish all the settings and define the Reference Types that are required by your output style.

To start, you will:

  • Establish the Settings for the citation type and bibliography

  • Define the Reference Types

Establishing the Settings (Citation, Notes and Bibliography)

You can define the output style settings by clicking the Bibliography, In-Text Citations and/or Notes tabs and expanding the Settings area.  These settings determine spacing, sort order and other information. Your style will have a combination of settings:  Bibliography settings, In-Text Citation settings or Notes settings (this is determined by your selection in the Citation Type drop-down).

  1. The Bibliography Settings are displayed first.  Click on the Bibliography Settings header to expand and display the bibliography settings options.

  2. Establish the settings (detailed information on the bibliography settings is available here).

  3. Click the Save button before continuing.

  4. Click the In-Text Citation tab (or Notes tab) to move to the next group of settings.  

  5. Click on the Citation Settings (or Notes Settings) header to expand and display the options.

  6. Establish the settings (detailed information is available on the in-text citation and notes settings).

  7. Click the Save button.

Defining the Reference Types

  1. You will need to define each reference type needed for your bibliography format, in-text citation format and/or notes format (or as provided in the Instructions to Authors examples). Click on the links for detailed information on how to do this.  You must tell RefWorks exactly which fields to include and how each field should appear (e.g., Periodical Name should be included and must be italicized.  Every space, period, comma, etc. must be defined. We recommend that periodically you update the preview section to be sure you are moving forward correctly.

    Note:
     In the Bibliography and/or Notes formatting, every output style style MUST have at least a generic reference type defined.  The generic reference type is used as a default and will be used by any reference in your RefWorks database that does not have a defined reference type.  You can modify the generic style, but we do not recommend deleting it. We recommend defining each reference type that you store in your RefWorks database.  This also applies to In-Text Citations when text information is included in the citation style.

    If the In-Text Citation format requires numeric values only, then there will not be any defined reference type formats.

  2. Preview each reference type that has been defined by selecting that type from the Reference Type drop-down located above the Fields for this Type and Output Fields Order boxes. Each reference type that has been set up for a particular format will say [defined] after it and will be displayed at the bottom of the screen.  

  3. Once you have checked and modified your settings and reference type definitions, click the Save button.  We recommend you generate a trial bibliography using your new style in the Bibliography, Create area of RefWorks.

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