Proquest Doctoral Dissertation Agreement Form

Introduction

Introduction to ETD Submissions

What is an ETD?

What is ProQuest?

What is the difference between ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

 

The Submission and Deposit Process

Why should I deposit my dissertation through ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

Are there special concerns that I need to be aware of when submitting a dissertation to an online environment such as ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

What guidelines do I need to follow for formatting my dissertation?

Will my dissertation remain available at ProQuest and/or ETD@CUA for perpetuity?

 

The Copyright and the Embargo

What do I need to know about copyrights?

May I include copyrighted material in the version of my dissertation that I upload to ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

Why do I have to agree to The ETD@CUA Submission Copyright Statement, and what does it say?

What rights do I grant The University when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

What rights do I assert when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

What rights do I reserve when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

What is an embargo?

Why would I use an embargo?

 

Working with Publishers

Will publishers be willing to accept a book or article based on my dissertation for publication in my dissertation is already available at ProQuest or ETD@CUA?

If parts of my dissertation have previously been published elsewhere, may I still deposit in ETD@CUA?

 

Access

Who can access ETD@CUA to search for and download my dissertation? What can users of ETD@CUA do with the content that I have submitted?

What if I have a question not answered here? 

 

Introduction

Introduction to ETD Submissions

The Catholic University of America requires ETD submission for Doctoral Dissertations only. If you are working on a Master's Thesis or Licentiate degree, you will be submitting a paper copy to the Office of the Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies, and not following this process.

What is an ETD?

“ETD” stands for “Electronic Theses and Dissertations”, and simply put, an ETD is an electronic copy of a doctoral dissertation or masters’ thesis. These copies can then be made available on a long-term basis as a replacement for paper copies added to a library’s shelves.

An ETD not only saves library shelf space, but can provide a student’s academic work to a wider audience than the library shelf could ever do. An ETD also saves time and money for graduate students by providing easier workflow for submitting a final dissertation copy.

What is ProQuest?

ProQuest Dissertation Publishing has been publishing dissertations and theses since 1938, and has published over 2 million graduate works from graduate schools around the world in that time. Their Dissertations and Theses-Full Text database contains the majority of dissertations published in the United States and is widely used by scholars worldwide.

When a student submits a dissertation to ProQuest, ProQuest will make that dissertation visible to scholars whose institutions provide paid access to the database, and that dissertation can be searched alongside other dissertations in the database. 

ProQuest also sells full-text, bound copies of dissertations directly to the public through their Dissertation Publishing division.

ProQuest allows authors to make specific choices about how their work will be distributed, including allowing an embargo to be placed on access for specified periods of time, or allowing the dissertation to be made freely available to users worldwide through the open access option. For more information on these options, submittal specifics, and explanations on which option would be best suited for your academic and professional needs, please visit the ProQuest website.

ProQuest does charge fees for submission, and the service has particular formatting and copyright requirements. Again, for more information of these fees and requirements, please visit the ProQuest website.

What is the difference between ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

ProQuest is a commercial vendor of databases and other information products, has over 700 active university publishing partners, and publishes more than 70,000 new graduate works each year. In addition to publishing, ProQuest provides access to graduate works for thousands of libraries around the world.

ETD@CUA is a part of DigitalScholarship@CUA, the Catholic University of America institutional repository of scholarly and research products of the CUA academic community. It collects, organizes, preserves, and provides free, open, and long-term access to CUA dissertations and thesis.

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The Submission and Deposit Process 

Why should I deposit my dissertation through ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

There are many benefits to contributing your work to ETD@CUA:

  • Your dissertation will be freely available to anyone who has access to the Internet.
  • Your dissertation will never be hidden in a dark corner of the Mullen Library forever.
  • Materials in ETD@CUA are open to search engine indexing, which makes it easy for people to find it.
  • Your ownership and copyrights to your dissertation will be indicated and will be guarded by the people who can freely access that dissertation.
  • Your dissertation will be preserved for long-term access with a permanent URL.
  • You have options to select an embargo period (see below).

Are there special concerns that I need to be aware of when submitting a dissertation to an online environment such as ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

In an online environment such as ETD@CUA, issues surrounding copyright and permissions are more complex.  We discuss this in greater detail below.  You will also need to consider whether to impose an embargo period to ensure that if you decide to convert the dissertation to a scholarly monograph or journal article, a future publisher will not view the existing digital copy as a barrier to publication.  These issues can be discipline-specific, and we recommend that you discuss them with your dissertation advisor.

What guidelines do I need to follow for formatting my dissertation?

Students are again asked to refer to the CUA Copyright Guidelines and The CUA Explanation of Licenses and Copyrights for information on determining whether and how to seek permission for any copyrighted material such as images, charts, graphs, media, etc. that you wish to include in your dissertation. 

If you have sought and been granted permission for such material, you should also be careful to review whether the permission obtained from the original author(s) is sufficient to enable to you to put your work online for open access.  

If you are concerned that third-party material exceeds Fair Use parameters, and you are unable to obtain sufficient permission to use it, you may need to remove such material from the deposited work as a precautionary matter.

Will my dissertation remain available at ProQuest and/or ETD@CUA for perpetuity?

As a member of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), the John K. Mullen of Denver Library (the holder of the ETD@CUA Depository) remains committed to the durability and sustainability of scholarship as deposited in ETD@CUA.  The Mullen Library staff and ETD@CUA use standard data management practices, including security and backup procedures, to provide a reasonable assurance that files will remain retrievable over time. 

However, while a modern library staff no longer needs to worry as much about moths or bookworms, even the era of “cloud” technology and off-site servers cannot 100% guarantee permanent access to online materials. Therefore, CUA recommends that all of her doctoral students and scholars keep personal copies of their dissertation files in both print and digital format.

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The Copyright and the Embargo

What do I need to know about copyrights?

Before you submit your doctoral dissertation online, before you even begin your dissertation, it is very important that you familiarize yourself with the basics of copyright law and understand its implications for your work.  This is especially true when any student is planning to submit a dissertation for public access through online services such as ProQuest or ETD@CUA. Remember, just as your copyright will be protected through public access, potential copyright violations are more apparent because of the higher visibility of the dissertation and the wider audience that it will reach. 

Therefore, before beginning the online process, students are encouraged to review the CUA Copyright Guidelines and The CUA Explanation of Licenses and Copyrights, which are provided as a general introduction, and which include links to additional sources with substantial information.

May I include copyrighted material in the version of my dissertation that I upload to ProQuest and ETD@CUA?

Students are again asked to refer to the CUA Copyright Guidelines and The CUA Explanation of Licenses and Copyrights for information on determining whether and how to seek permission for any copyrighted material such as images, charts, graphs, media, etc. that you wish to include in your dissertation. 

If you have sought and been granted permission for such material, you should also be careful to review whether the permission obtained from the original author(s) is sufficient to enable to you to put your work online for open access.  

If you are concerned that third-party material exceeds Fair Use parameters, and you are unable to obtain sufficient permission to use it, you may need to remove such material from the deposited work as a precautionary matter.

If you have further questions on Fair Use parameters, Creative Commons licenses, copyrights and permissions, please feel free to contact the Office of the General Counsel, visit the General Counsel website, or consult the ProQuest publication Copyright and Your Dissertation or Thesis: Ownership, Fair Use, and Your Rights and Responsibilities.

Why do I have to agree to The ETD@CUA Submission Copyright Statement, and what does it say?

In order to deliver written works and other copyrighted materials to the public, both ProQuest and ETD@CUA must have consent from the copyright holder. The ETD@CUA Submission Copyright Statement asks you, the author, to confirm that you are the copyright holder and that you have obtained any necessary permissions for any third-party material included in the thesis or dissertation.  In addition, if portions of your dissertation were previously published, the agreement confirms that you have retained the rights to place this material online.

What rights do I grant The University when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

  • You grant The Catholic University of America (“Institution”), your academic department (“Department”), and Digital Scholarship at CUA (“Repository”) the non-exclusive right to reproduce and/or distribute the doctoral submission (including the metadata and abstract) to students, faculty, staff, and walk-in users of CUA libraries, and those libraries of the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC), in any format or medium, for non-commercial, research, educational, or related academic purposes only.
  • You authorize The Catholic University of America to allow CUA community users of the repository to distribute your doctoral submission (including the metadata and abstract) in any format or medium, for CUA internal, non-commercial, research, educational, or related academic purposes only.
  • You authorize The Catholic University of America to translate the doctoral submission into any medium or format and keep more than one copy for the purposes of security, back up and long-term preservation of the scholarly record. 

What rights do I assert when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

  • The submission is your original work, and/or that you have the right to grant the rights contained in this license.

  • The submission does not, to the best of your knowledge, infringe upon anyone's copyright.

  • The submission contains no libelous or other unlawful matter and makes no improper invasion of the privacy of any other person.

  • If the submission contains material for which you do not hold copyright and that exceeds fair use, you represent that you have obtained the unrestricted permission of the copyright owner to grant The Catholic University of America the rights required by this license, and that such third-party owned material is clearly identified and acknowledged within the text or content of the submission.

  • If the submission is based upon work that has been sponsored or supported by an agency or organization other than The Catholic University of America, such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, or private funder(s), you represent that you have fulfilled any right of review, confidentiality, or other obligations required by that contract or agreement.

What rights do I reserve when I deposit my dissertation in ETD@CUA?

  • The Catholic University of America will clearly identify your name(s) as the author(s) or owner(s) of the submission, and will not make any alteration, other than as allowed the license you grant to The Catholic University of America, to my submission.

  • You do not give up the copyright to your work, and you do not give up the right to submit the work to publishers or share it with other repositories or individuals. 

What is an embargo?

An embargo is a period of time during which your dissertation is saved in ProQuest or ETD@CUA but is not available for worldwide distribution. While under embargo, the metadata (title, abstract, etc.) for your work is available to the world, but the full text of your work is not.  You set the embargo period, which may be 1 year, 2 years or 5 years. ProQuest offers these same embargo periods (though not the 5-year option) for dissertations submitted to their database.

These parameters are indicated on The ETD@CUA Submission Copyright Statement when you deposit your work.

Why would I use an embargo?

There are several reasons why you would consider an embargo.  One is to protect your ability to publish your work; see the following question for more on this.  Other reasons would be to satisfy requirements for review of grant-sponsored research, to protect data being utilized by a team of researchers of which you are a part, or to protect your ability to apply for a patent based on your research.  It is important that you discuss any such considerations with your major professor, department chair or school dean prior to your deposit with ProQuest and ETD@CUA. 

While the staff in the Mullen Library or Office of the Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies cannot provide advice regarding the need for or proper length of embargoes, we are committed to working with you to ensure that your need for an embargo is met.  Please contact us the Office of Graduate Studies at cua-graduatestudies@cua.edu or the Mullen Library staff at libraries.cua.edu/form/contact.cfm if you need to discuss a longer embargo period.

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Working with Publishers

Will publishers be willing to accept a book or article based on my dissertation for publication in my dissertation is already available at ProQuest or ETD@CUA?

ProQuest has useful advice on this question. Recent research (see here and here) also confirms that most publishers will generally not reject a submission based on prior publication as an ETD. Please see the “Advice to Graduate Students Based on the 2011 Publishers’ Survey” section of the first article for some practical advice about approaches to publication.

However, be aware that policies will vary from publisher to publisher. If you are in doubt about the future publication of your dissertation, you may want to consider an embargo period, during which your dissertation is saved in ProQuest or ETD@CUA but not available for public view.  An embargo may be used to balance publishers’ interests in being the first to publish scholarly books or articles, while also ensuring that scholarship is accessible to the general public within a reasonable period of time. During the embargo the abstract and metadata for your submission can be made public while the full text remains hidden.

If parts of my dissertation have previously been published elsewhere, may I still deposit in ETD@CUA?

If parts of your dissertation have previously been published, such as in a journal article or book, you will need to check the copyright transfer agreement of the journal or book that you signed at the time of publication. The agreement may make explicit reference to your right to deposit in your institution’s digital repository, along with any specific guidelines to follow. You can also check the publisher’s website. Many major academic publishers now have clear statements about author’s rights on their websites, and many are generous in allowing their authors to deposit a version of a work in a repository.

The SHERPA/RoMEO site provides a useful compilation of many major publishers’ policies.

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Access

Who can access ETD@CUA to search for and download my dissertation? What can users of ETD@CUA do with the content that I have submitted?

Dissertations circulate to CUA borrowers with valid, updated library privileges, including students from other Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) schools. The locations and call numbers for dissertations and masters theses can be found in the WRLC Libraries Catalog.

Patrons may also access electronic copies of dissertations dated after 1996 through Dissertation Abstracts International, a database searchable by title, author, school, area of study, and more. The "Free Download" button in a dissertation record indicates its electronic availability.

ETD@CUA does not lend CUA dissertations dated 1962 or later through Interlibrary Loan or copy them. These dissertations are available for purchase through University Microfilms International (UMI), at www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/disexpress.shtml.

Dissertations dated before 1962 may be copied or borrowed through Interlibrary Loan by persons not affiliated with CUA or the WRLC. Contact your local public, academic, or business library for details. 

What if I have a question not answered here?

Please contact the Mullen Library staff at libraries.cua.edu/form/contact.cfm or the Office of Graduate Studies at cua-graduatestudies@cua.edu.

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Other Resources and Forms

Contact Information

Office of the Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies

116 McMahon Hall

The Catholic University of America

620 Michigan Avenue, NE

Washington, DC 20064

 

Main Phone: (202) 319-5247
Fax: (202) 319-6174

 Email: cua-graduatestudies@cua.edu

 

Questions about Content

Questions about Embargoes

Questions about Publishing Rights

Questions about the Submissions Process

Questions about Content

How long has ProQuest been disseminating and archiving doctoral dissertations and theses?

ProQuest has partnered with academic institutions around the world to archive and disseminate a comprehensive collection of dissertations and theses. The program started in 1939 with a goal to create a U.S. national repository of graduate works. ProQuest now has partnerships with most of the doctoral institutions in the U.S. and Canada and with a significant and growing list of international universities. Each year, ProQuest adds more than 130,000 new dissertations and theses to its largest dissertation database, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT) Global.

How much content is contained in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global?

PQDT Global now offers abstracts and indexing for approximately 4 million dissertations and theses, with full text (PDFs) for more than 2 million of those works. Coverage for the database begins in 1637, and full-text coverage is primarily from 1997 forward. All of these graduate works are carefully indexed to enable convenient search and discovery by the scholarly community and researchers of all kinds. ProQuest’s suite of dissertation services is accessed by more than 3,000 institutions worldwide. For the exact number of dissertations in ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Global, search for publication year higher than the year 1000. 

How much non-U.S. content does ProQuest provide?

ProQuest has been adding non-U.S.-content to PQDT Full Text, the predecessor to PQDT Global, for a long time through extensive and longstanding partnerships with graduate institutions in Canada; and PQDT Global now includes dissertations and theses from more than 60 countries. As the scholarly community has become increasingly global, ProQuest has continued to increase its focus on developing partnerships with universities and national associations to archive and disseminate dissertations from around the world. PQDT Global provides access to works from the United Kingdom, Continental Europe, and Asia Pacific regions in addition to comprehensive coverage from the U.S. and Canada. Content growth for PQDT Global is being driven by a multiyear program of partnerships with academic institutions and national associations. The initial content partners for PQDT Global were University College London, London School of Economics and Political Science, University of Cardiff, University of Leicester, University of Bath, University of Aberdeen, and Universidad de Valencia.

What is the quality of the dissertation PDFs contained in the database?

At ProQuest, we strive to maximize the quality of scans based upon current technologies. Some older works from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses that were scanned from bi-tonal microfilm images have reduced quality. We strive to ensure the best image quality at the time of original filming. We always have a number of projects underway to upgrade our content and experience to meet the changing needs of researchers. For example, in 2008, ProQuest creating OCR scans for older dissertations in order to make full-text PDFs of graduate works searchable. We anticipate that this project will be complete in 2014.

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Questions about Embargoes

Why are some dissertations/theses embargoed?

At any given time, some of the works from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses are unavailable due to embargoes. Embargo restrictions are typically requested by authors as copyright holders, in consultation with their universities, and may be placed for various reasons. Some examples include patents pending on elements contained within the graduate work and concerns about data privacy, particularly relating to patients in the medical fields.

What are the specific embargo options?

ProQuest believes strongly that the author, in conjunction with his/her university advisors, should direct decisions about dissertation dissemination. The reality is that publishers and their editorial boards vary in their views on whether submission of a dissertation or thesis to ProQuest or an institutional repository constitutes a prior publication that may disqualify the author from submitting a journal article or monograph on the same subject matter for publication. While the majority of publishers do not find the publication of a dissertation or thesis problematic, potential conflicts should be carefully considered and explored. For authors concerned with the prior publication issue, ProQuest offers a number of embargo options to meet their needs.

What are your “prior publication” policies?

ProQuest believes strongly that the author, in conjunction with his/her university advisors, should direct decisions about dissertation dissemination. The reality is that publishers and their editorial boards vary in their views on whether submission of a dissertation or thesis to ProQuest or an institutional repository constitutes a prior publication that may disqualify the author from submitting a journal article or monograph on the same subject matter for publication. While the majority of publishers do not find the publication of a dissertation or thesis problematic, potential conflicts should be carefully considered and explored. For authors concerned with the prior publication issue, ProQuest offers a number of embargo options to meet their needs.

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Questions about Publishing Rights

Does ProQuest “publish” dissertations?

Primarily, ProQuest is an archiving and dissemination partner for more than 700 institutions worldwide, enabling the works of their graduate students to become part of the larger scholarly record. Authors retain the copyright to their work, inclusion in ProQuest is non-exclusive, and we offer a number of options, including Open Access. Because ProQuest assigns ISBNs to dissertations, inclusion in the database could be considered to represent a form of publishing. However, dissemination via ProQuest complements and is in no way a substitute for monograph or scholarly journal publishing.

Can I distribute my dissertation elsewhere if I submit it to ProQuest?
Yes, submission to ProQuest is non-exclusive, and authors are totally free to publish their work or make it available elsewhere at any time. Authors retain copyright and direct decisions regarding the dissemination of their work. Dissemination choices can be modified at any time after submission to ProQuest by contacting our customer service team.

How does ProQuest make dissertations available to academic databases?

ProQuest plays a key role in the aggregation of dissertations ─ preserving, archiving and making them accessible at the authors’ discretion and direction to researchers at more than 3,000 institutions around the world. Through our dissemination program, we also make un-embargoed works available to major academic databases including PsycINFO (Psychology), SciFinder (Chemistry), ERIC (Education), MLA (modern languages, literatures, folklore, and linguistics), MathSciNet (Mathematics) – full list here. This enhances discovery within the author’s discipline and also enables the authors’ works to be showcased for use in other academic journals, working papers, reports and studies. ProQuest continues to develop and expand partnerships in order to raise the visibility of dissertations and theses through high-quality, relevant indexes and databases.

Will my dissertation be available for sale?

Unless authors choose to embargo their work, copies are available for sale directly from ProQuest via the Dissertation Express service and the PQDT index database – for researchers or libraries to purchase copies. These services focus on serving the information needs of the global research community. Dissertations and theses are also made available in the libraries of more than 3,000 academic institutions around the world via subscriptions to our databases such as ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Full Text and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. Authors earn royalties based upon the sales and downloads of their work.

Does ProQuest sell dissertations on commercial sites such as Amazon?

ProQuest no longer provides graduate works to third-party retailers for distribution. Our reseller program with Amazon is being discontinued, with all existing agreements ending in 2014.

Why should I allow ProQuest, a commercial provider, to disseminate and archive my dissertation?

ProQuest is not a “new media” publishing company jumping into a perceived market opportunity. We have been partnering with scholars and academic institutions to publish dissertations since the late-1930s and have proven our commitment to the academic community.
Working with ProQuest provides unparalleled dissemination of authors’ dissertations and theses to the scholarly community. ProQuest’s dissertations services exist and evolve to fulfill the information requirements of academic institutions and their authors. Disseminating and archiving dissertations is an investment for both ProQuest and our partner institutions. Our dissertations solutions add value for authors and institutions on a number of different levels, such as the following:

  • ProQuest assists researchers and institutions in discoverability and dissemination of their dissertations and theses; the database is accessed by researchers at more than 3,000 institutions worldwide.
  • Inclusion in ProQuest provides access to an author’s dissertation alongside decades of groundbreaking research from doctoral and master’s institutions.
  • Metadata is made available to key subject indexes and database services including PyscINFO (psychology), SciFinder (chemistry), ERIC (education), MLA (modern languages, literatures, folklore, and linguistics), MathSciNet (mathematics), etc. ProQuest continues to develop and expand partnerships in order to raise the visibility of dissertations and theses through high-quality, relevant indexes and databases.
  • Inclusion in PQDT enables discovery alongside the work of established leaders in their fields. ProQuest aggregates content from more than 90,000 scholarly journals and more than 86,000 ebooks that are used every day in every major research library in the world. ProQuest’s acclaimed research platform cross-searches journal databases with dissertations content, enabling your dissertation to be viewed along with other major works on the topic.

More information on the advantages of submission to ProQuest is available on the ProQuest website.

What are the best channels to use in disseminating my work?

ProQuest recommends that authors explore all available options for dissemination of their work. We encourage authors to consult with their universities to understand how institutional policies might impact their dissemination options. ProQuest’s author agreement for dissertations and theses is non-exclusive. Authors have the full right to make their works available to other commercial services or for open access outside of the ProQuest service. Further dissemination options, such as distribution via an Institutional Repository, can occur in parallel with availability through ProQuest. Our view is that dissemination via a combination both of ProQuest and an Institutional Repository provides maximum exposure for authors and institutions.

Does ProQuest pay author royalties?

Yes, we pay royalties based on copy sales and usage of dissertations to authors who submit their work to ProQuest. ProQuest pays royalties of 10% of its net revenue from sales of your dissertation or thesis in all formats, including PDF, hardbound, softbound, and microfilm formats. We also pay royalties for downloads as part of a ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Global subscription. Sales in all formats are added together on an annual basis and checks remitted to authors. Royalties are paid when they reach a total of $25.00 USD. If royalties in a single year do not reach $25.00 USD, the funds are rolled over to the following year. Royalties are not paid if they do not accrue to $25.00 USD after 25 years. You must maintain a current address on record with ProQuest to receive a royalty. 

Does ProQuest make dissertations discoverable via search engines such as Google?

Authors submitting their dissertation to ProQuest choose whether or not to allow discovery of their work via search engines. However, note that it is also possible for search engines and other vendors to harvest your work if it is posted in a university institutional repository.

How much does it cost to submit my dissertation to ProQuest?

For most authors, there’s no charge to disseminate and archive dissertations and theses via ProQuest. There are nominal fees for: Dissertation/Theses when supplied in paper form or via FTP; and for the additional visibility that is offered by participation in PQDT Open, ProQuest’s open access database.

Do you allow Open Access discovery?

Yes. For authors and institutions wishing to make their works available via Open Access, ProQuest supports two different avenues of dissemination:

  1. Institutional Repository Dissemination: Authors and institutions are at liberty to make their works freely available through their Institutional Repositories or other Open Access sites to be discovered through Google or other search systems. We also partner with libraries to make it easier to secure author approval and post graduate works to institutional repositories. Where university sites have enabled the functionality, authors can even specify rights granted for the version of their work in the Institutional Repository through a Creative Commons license.
  2. ProQuest Open Access Publishing PLUS: At participating institutions, authors who wish to extend discovery of their works via Open Access, they can pay a publication fee ($95) to have their full text work made discoverable and accessible through several additional channels:
    • PQDT Open – a free standalone web portal for searching ProQuest Open Access works.
    • PQDT A&I – In the Abstract and Index version of PQDT, Open Access works are available to users at no charge. o Search Engine Optimization - ProQuest allows Google, Bing, Yahoo, etc. to index PQDT to retrieve bibliographic information, but PQDT Open Access Publishing PLUS works are able to be accessed in their entirety through standard search engines.
    • Search Engine Optimization - ProQuest allows Google, Bing, Yahoo, etc. to index PQDT to retrieve bibliographic information, but PQDT Open Access Publishing PLUS works are able to be accessed in their entirety through standard search engines.

What is the relationship between ProQuest and iParadigms (turnitin.com, ithenticate.com)?

ProQuest received feedback from many university administrators and library staff who were concerned about maintaining the quality and integrity of their theses and dissertations.  Several partner institutions asked if we could enhance their efforts to educate their authors regarding how their academic integrity policies work and assist with maintaining “originality” standards.  We explored a range of educational applications available for this purpose and chose the Turnitin and iThenticate services from iParadigms.  Full press announcement: http://www.educationnews.org/technology/turnitin-proquest-to-add-dissertation-database.

ProQuest chose Turnitin and iThenticate for several reasons.  iParadigms is a recognized leader in the area of originality checking.  More than 1.6 million faculty rely on Turnitin to do originality checking, on-line grading and peer reviews.  Some 24 million students use Turnitin and more than 400 million papers have been submitted by students.  Currently, iParadigms reports more than 10,000 institutional licenses are currently in place in 135 countries.  Hundreds of major publishers and non-academic consumers of research also rely on iThenticate to ensure work is original and sourced correctly.

Through its partnership with iParadigms, ProQuest offers authors, institutions, publishers and other non-academic research entities a means of ensuring the originality of new work and ensuring creators of previously produced work are appropriately acknowledged.  The Turnitin and iThenticate tools from iParadigms are a helpful resource for protecting the reputation of institutions, advisors, students, researchers, writers and publishers.

How much of the theses or dissertation is revealed in Turnitin/iThenticate?

Only content in the theses or dissertations that matches will appear.  Author names and titles are not typically revealed.  (Further information here: http://www.turnitin.com/en_us/features/originalitycheck)

Who owns theses and dissertations once they are submitted to Turnitin/iThenticate?

Students retain the copyright of documents submitted to Turnitin/iThenticate.  iParadigms has a limited license to use the works as part of the plagiarism prevention system.  Turnitin's use of student papers under Fair Use was settled in a United States District Court of Law in 2007 and affirmed upon appeal in 2009. (Further information here: http://turnitin.com/en_us/about-us/privacy-center/legal-faqs)

How can I have my work removed from Turnitin/iThenticate?

While most authors appreciate inclusion in the Turnitin and iThenticate databases, some authors do not want their work included.  To request removal of the ProQuest copy of graduate works, authors should contact disspub@proquest.com.  Please note that while the ProQuest copy of the dissertation or theses will be removed from Turnitin/iThenticate, if the work appears on other open access websites or institutional repositories, those copies may continue to be included in TurnitIn/iThenticate because of the work’s availability online.

Questions about the Submissions Process

I want to submit a dissertation in a non-PDF format [e.g. audio file, video file]. How can I do that?

To do this using ETD Administrator, please upload a PDF containing the title of your graduate work and any other relevant written material in the “PDF” section of the site. In the "Supplemental Files section, please upload the non-PDF component of your graduate work. (You may upload multiple files as needed in the “Supplemental Files” section).

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