Order Essays Online Uk Mail

Students can buy essays guaranteed to achieve a 2:1 - or get their money back

By Daily Mail Reporter
Updated: 18:31 GMT, 4 April 2010

The essays are offered to students as a 'resource' and are not intended to be handed in, the firm says (file picture)

A company is selling dissertations to students with a cashback guarantee if they are not up to a 2:1 standard.

The work costs £700, but for £2,100, UKEssays.com can produce a ghost-written first class version, while £15,000 will pay for an MA dissertation.

The essays are officially offered to students as a ‘resource’ and are not intended to be handed in, say the firm who insists it is not encouraging dishonesty.

The tailor-made service is becoming increasingly popular with students as universities become more efficient at detecting direct plagiarism from the internet.

Most universities now scan submitted work using anti-plagiarism software, but UKEssays promise to test-scan their own copy to ensure it cannot be detected.

Managing director Tony Eynon described his cashback guarantee as ‘a real breakthrough in contemporary academia.’

But Bahram Bekhradnia, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, told The Sunday Times: ‘It is potentially very serious and undermines the whole fabric of higher education.’

A message on the UKEssays website pledges: ‘The service we offer is 100 per cent legal, very legitimate and won’t make you a cheater.

‘We do understand that some students will use our work dishonestly. This is because there are a lot of essay companies who permit students to simply pass off the work as their own, and so a minority of students confuse us with those companies and assume we offer the same service.

‘We also know that because our work is 100 per cent original and plagiarism free, there is little we can do to regulate that misuse.

‘But we truly believe that a student who uses our work properly – as a guideline for their own research and writing – will benefit from our service a great deal more than a student who just hands in the work as if it were their own – they’re the real essay cheats!’

The firm also pledges compensation of £5,000 plus a full refund if plagiarism is detected in the work, as well as a free re-write.

It boasts of access to 4,000 writing experts, all of whom have obtained a 2:1 degree or higher.

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Universities Minister Jo Johnson is launching nationwide guidance to tackle the plagiarism problem on university campuses

Students who cheat using ‘essay mill’ websites face tough penalties under a government crackdown.

Universities Minister Jo Johnson is launching nationwide guidance to tackle the plagiarism problem on university campuses.

This could lead to growing numbers of undergraduates being expelled for serious offences in future.

At least 100 websites provide custom written essays for students to submit as part of their degrees.

At present, it is left to individual institutions to develop their own plagiarism policies in line with the UK Quality Code for Higher Education.

Mr Johnson has now told higher education watchdog the Quality Assurance Agency, Universities UK, which represents vice chancellors, and the National Union of Students to draw up guidelines to clamp down on campus cheats.

He wants the QAA to take action against the online advertising of essay mill websites, and universities to impose ‘tough new penalties’ on students who use them.

It is understood the Government expects universities to sign up to this voluntary guidance, due to be introduced for the 2017/18 academic year, to help create a standard approach across institutions in dealing with students who turn to these services.

This could involve recommending that all universities use expulsions to combat use of the websites, or that they place of marks against students’ academic records, which would prevent them studying further, such as for masters degrees.

The Department for Education has not ruled out introducing further sanctions in future such as fines or prosecution, but this would require legislation.

Mr Johnson said: ‘This form of cheating is unacceptable and every university should have strong policies and sanctions in place to detect and deal with it.

‘Essay mill websites threaten to undermine the high quality reputation of a UK degree so it is vital that the sector works together to address this in a consistent and robust way.’

The spread of essay mill websites was uncovered in a QAA report, commissioned by the Government and published last year. It warned that essay mills were a ‘growing threat to UK higher education’.

The QAA found that the websites often advertise their services to students for a fee and many promote ‘plagiarism free guarantees’ or essays tested against plagiarism detection software.

At present, it is left to individual institutions to develop their own plagiarism policies in line with the UK Quality Code for Higher Education

Prices charged by these sites vary depending on the complexity of essay and tightness of deadline.

They can range from £200 for a single essay to as high as £6,750 for a PhD dissertation. Ian Kimber, the QAA’s standards director, said: ‘Essay mills are a major challenge for universities and colleges because, unlike other forms of cheating, the practice is notoriously difficult to detect.

‘We look forward to continuing our work with the Government and sector colleagues in addressing an issue potentially damaging to students and the reputation of UK higher education.’

Universities already have penalties for students found to be submitting work that is not their own.

Such academic misconduct is a breach of an institution’s disciplinary regulations and can result in students being expelled. But there is no standard approach. The new guidance will urge universities to target essay mill cheats. Institutions will be asked to publicise better their current policies on student cheating.

Information will also be issued to students ‘about the potentially significant negative impacts on their future if they are caught cheating’.

Dame Julia Goodfellow, president of Universities UK, said: ‘Universities take plagiarism and cheating extremely seriously. Submitting work written by someone else is cheating and devalues the efforts of students who work hard to achieve their degrees.

‘The higher education sector has already done a lot of work in this area and universities have become more experienced in detecting and dealing with such forms of cheating. Universities UK will work with the QAA and the NUS to update guidance in this area.

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The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

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